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5 Favorite Spring Blooming Trees

Posted by William on

5 Favorite Spring Blooming TreesFew things are more of a welcomed sight than when our trees start bursting into blooms! If you are thinking of adding some spring blooming trees to your landscape, here is a list of favorites, and why…

 

Ornamental Crabapples are probably the most recognized and most utilized spring blooming trees in the Midwest. There are over 50 species to choose from, that come in a wide array of blooming colors and sizes. Crabapples although beautiful, can be susceptible to various diseases including cedar apple rust which can be avoided with proper placement. Crabapple lovers can take heart that nearly every year new disease resistant species seem to be added to the list!

 

Bradford Pears have a similar look to crabapples when in bloom. They are mostly grown in the eastern part of the United States as quick growing small trees that supply abundant white flowers. Bradford Pear is generally a weak tree that gets damaged easily by the elements. It is also invasive in many parts of the country making native substitutes for this ornamental spring beauty increasingly popular.

 

Eastern Redbuds are great Native American alternatives to Bradford Pears. Elegant and sturdy, their bright purple blooms are seen gracing Eastern landscapes in early spring. Their tough nature makes them a good choice for landscapes in zones 4 – 9 across the country.  Use in a woodland border garden or as part of a formal landscape – it’s all good!

 

The Magnolia species is often associated with southern United States. But this tree has numerous varieties that come from all over the world, making some of them a reasonable choice for more northerly climates. Generally speaking, magnolias need wind protection and don’t like weather extremes. They also need their space, which is fine because when they bloom they should be left alone in all their glory for everyone to enjoy!

 

Serviceberry is a North American native that offers pretty white blooms that turn into red summer berries. But don’t expect the berries to last long as they are coveted by native song birds, making this a dream-of-a-tree for bird watchers and nature enthusiasts.  This is a highly adaptable small tree that comes in many regional variations to suit your climate. As a native woodland species, it is right at home in a partly sunny spot, but will turn brilliant autumn orange and reds if given more sun.

 


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